Tag Archives: Men’s Health Week

Find—and Build—Your Best Company Culture, A Q2 Blueprint

When you truly believe that your people are your greatest asset, you invest in them accordingly. But how can job seekers tell how a company treats team members before accepting the offer? While we can’t beam you in for a spectral journey through your prospective Consilium career (think “Star-Trek-meets-Ghost-of-Christmas-Future”), we can shed a little light on our approach to maintaining a fun, productive, and supportive work environment.

Here’s how it looked to be part of the Consilium team in Q2 2017:

Consilium Cares—Working for the Greater Good

Increasingly, job seekers want their workplace to offer a means of making a positive impact on the world around them. At Consilium, we work to strengthen our community through the work of Consilium Cares, our company philanthropy program.

On April 22, Consilium Cares again participated in the Red Balloon Run and Ride benefit for Children’s Health. The Run and Ride offers 5K options for people of all ages and fitness levels, with alternatives that include a family-friendly “fun run” and walking and cycling events.

 

 

 

 

On June 10th, we also continued our volunteer partnership with the North Texas Food Bank. During our shift, Consilium Cares volunteers helped bag more than 10,000 (!) meals for senior citizens in the Dallas area.

 

 

 

Administrative Professionals’ Day

April 26th was National Administrative Professionals’ Day, a great opportunity to show our appreciation for Megan, whose selflessness, customer service skills, and professionalism are second to none. On top of her normal work duties, Megan always manages to give a warm, genuine welcome to every person who steps foot into our lobby.

 

 

 

Play Ball!

One of Consilium’s most popular social events is the annual excursion to a Texas Rangers game. This year, we attended the Rangers’ final game on May 13th against the Oakland Athletics (and certainly as a result of our patronage, the Rangers won 6-5—you’re welcome, guys!).

Wear Blue Day

Men’s Health Week, an initiative designed to increase awareness of health issues affecting men and boys, was held on June 12-18th this year. Consilium joined in by participating in the international #WearBlueDay on Friday, June 16th.

Kudos to our Operations team, which won the company-wide “#ShowUsYourBlue” contest this year—way to go Ops!

WIN Meeting

Each month, we hold a WIN meeting to recognize and celebrate individual, team, and company milestones. Standard awards include recognition of standout team member performance in client sales, recruiting, account management, and operations.

Congratulations to our three team members who earned promotions this quarter:

  • Sarah Chapman—Risk, Privileging, and Quality Assurance Manager
  • Tamara Ratigan—Operations Manager
  • Matt Tate—Senior Client Sales Consultant, Primary Care North

National Healthcare Recruiter Recognition Day

June 6th is National Healthcare Recruiter Recognition Day, and boy did our recruiting consultants deserve the shout-out! It is due in large part to the efforts of our recruiters that Consilium is projecting a year-over-year growth rate of 43% for 2017.

 

 

 

 

Interested in joining a growing company that invests in your personal and professional development? Search our open career opportunities or get more information about Consilium.

Health Tips for Male Physicians From Fellow Doctors

Disclaimer: Views and opinions expressed in this blog are based on the expert opinions of the quoted medical professionals. Post content does not constitute medical advice and is not a reflection of the official stance of Consilium Staffing.

Despite their vast medical knowledge and everyday immersion in the healthcare field, physicians are not immune from facing the same health struggles they help their patients navigate. In fact, as their schedules becoming increasingly hectic, physicians may actually be at higher risk for hypertension, burnout, and slipping into a sedentary lifestyle, all of which can be linked to poorer physical and psychological health. For Men’s Health Week, we spoke with two family practice physicians for tips on how fellow male physicians can counteract those risk factors and maintain peak physical and psychological health.

  • Sahba Ferdowsi currently practices medicine at a men’s health clinic, where he guides patients through health challenges specific to adult men.
  • Steve Papariello, medical director for the Men’s Wellness Centers located in Florida and Virginia, operated his own practice for more than 25 years.

Make Your Well-Being a Priority (And Don’t Apologize For It)

“You have to truly, truly prioritize self-care,” said Papariello. “If you aren’t taking care of yourself, it’s a lot harder to provide the best possible care for your patients and to be your best self for your family.”

Many physicians are unsatisfied with their current work schedules, which frequently leave little room for vacations, time with family and friends, or the pursuit of outside interests. That combination can quickly lead to burnout, one of the many factors that lead physicians to make the switch to working locum tenens, which offers the flexibility to prioritize your emotional health while maintaining your medical career.

“If you want to maintain longevity working in medicine, you absolutely have to figure out how to create a realistic work-life balance,” Ferdowsi said. “You have to leave work at work, period, and you have to decide how much you can work and still feel ‘full’ emotionally. I have found that mindful meditation is incredibly helpful in bridging that gap in my own life. I certainly recommend that physicians begin practicing mindfulness as part of their self-care routine.”

Take Charge of Your Own Health by Going ‘Back to the Basics’

If you ask most physicians about the health advice they give their patients, two dominant themes emerge: diet and exercise. But in their personal life? Studies have indicated that as physicians work increasingly long hours, physical activity is erased from their daily routine. [2] Additionally, physicians experiencing burnout are more likely to describe themselves as overweight or obese than are physicians who do not report burnout symptoms. [1, 3]

“It’s something we all already know, but the most important thing you can do to improve your health is to simply return to the big two: diet and exercise,” said Ferdowsi. “Watch your overall calorie consumption, eat more fruits and vegetables, and get up and exercise—even if it’s just going for walks.”

Papariello agrees, and adds the recommendation that busy physicians exercise first thing in the morning. “I get up at 4:30 in the morning to go biking,” he said. “Otherwise, I know it wouldn’t happen. Previously, I worked upwards of 12 hours per day, seven days a week. By the time I got finished for the day, there was just no way I was dragging myself to go work out. But when I bike in the morning, I actually get to enjoy it again.”

Enlist a Support Team

As a physician, you frequently make decisions that affect your patients, your practice, and everyone on your healthcare team. But who helps you take an objective look at your own health and well-being?

Ferdowsi highlighted the importance of relying on a solid relationship with another healthcare provider: your own physician. “Make sure you have a good primary care physician, adhere to the age-based recommended schedule for testing, and if you feel like something might be wrong, don’t put off going to see your doctor. We don’t talk about this nearly enough, but as you age, you become increasingly at risk for developing symptoms associated with low testosterone levels. See your physician if you notice elevated fatigue, decreases in muscle mass, and a loss of interest in activities you usually enjoy.”

In addition to your primary care provider, Papariello adds that family members can be invaluable in helping physicians check in on whether their current arrangement is meeting their needs.

“When I worked such long hours, I was unhappy with my schedule but was too exhausted to do much to change that,” said Papariello. “My move to working as a medical director was actually due to my wife. I came home late one Monday and learned that after seeing an ad for a job that looked like a good fit, she had set me up for an interview the next day. I jumped at the opportunity and haven’t looked back since. Now I certainly don’t advocate that everyone go become a medical director, but I would suggest that you keep an open line of communication with those who know you best.”

Daily Health Tips for Busy Physicians

Health and fitness advice can often be nuanced and complicated. Drs. Ferdowsi and Papariello recommend keeping it simple and adding a few of these behaviors to your daily routine for a measureable improvement in your overall health:

Considering a change in your practice schedule or setting? Search our open locum tenens job opportunities and build your career around your ideal work-life balance.

Sources

  1. Helfand BK, Mukamal KJ. Healthcare and lifestyle practices of healthcare workers: do healthcare workers practice what they preach? JAMA Intern Med. 2013;173:242-244.
  2. Liang, J. J. (2014). Diet and Exercise During Cardiology Fellowship Training. Journal of the American College of Cardiology, 64(16), 1755-1757. doi:10.1016/j.jacc.2014.08.026
  3. Medscape, Physician Lifestyle Report 2015.